UNESCO World Heritage Site #296 – Le Havre, the City Rebuilt by Auguste Perret

UNESCO World Heritage Site #296 - Le Havre, the City Rebuilt by Auguste Perret
UNESCO World Heritage Site #296 – Le Havre, the City Rebuilt by Auguste Perret

From the World Heritage inscription:

The city of Le Havre, on the English Channel in Normandy, was severely bombed during the Second World War. The destroyed area was rebuilt according to the plan of a team headed by Auguste Perret, from 1945 to 1964. The site forms the administrative, commercial and cultural centre of Le Havre. Le Havre is exceptional among many reconstructed cities for its unity and integrity. It combines a reflection of the earlier pattern of the town and its extant historic structures with the new ideas of town planning and construction technology. It is an outstanding post-war example of urban planning and architecture based on the unity of methodology and the use of prefabrication, the systematic utilization of a modular grid, and the innovative exploitation of the potential of concrete.

If you are a big fan of city planning, I suppose Le Havre is on your bucket list.

If you are not not a big fan of city planning, then you can probably skip it.

Every so often I visit a site where I scratch my head wondering “why is this a world heritage site”. This is one of them.

I struggled to find something to photograph. I did a Google search and found that pretty much every write up of this site had a photo of the same building….the one shown above.

One Reply to “UNESCO World Heritage Site #296 – Le Havre, the City Rebuilt by Auguste Perret”

  1. Some UNESCO WHS are a mystery… even though, of course, they list the reasons why they’re heritage, but I get your point. Lately I’ve been drawn to industrial heritage sites. I’m sure it has something to do with living in a former industrial city.

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