About Gary Arndt

My name is Gary Arndt. In March 2007 I set out to travel around the world...
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Day 9, West Africa Cruise – At Sea, Off the Coast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Latitude: 6° 32.6948’ S
Longitude: 11° 50.4849’ E

At a certain level, a ship has to be self sustaining. When you are at sea, you can’t run to the home depot to fix a problem. You need the tools and talent on board to solve whatever problems might arise.

I have been incredibly impressed with the problem solving abilities of the crew on the Expedition.

Case 1: If you are a MacBook owner, you are probably aware of the problem with the power cords. The incredible thin cables have a tendency to fray and eventually break at the point where they are connected to the power brick. For the 4th time since I’ve owned a MacBook mine died, and I had the great timing of doing it while I was on a ship in West Africa. Getting a new power cord wasn’t an option.

I contacted a member of the crew who put me in touch with the ship’s electrician who managed, not only to fix it, but made it better than it was. He shored up each end of the wire so it wouldn’t bend. The best part, is that he managed to do this is 30 minutes!

Case 2: The Expedition was originally built as a Norwegian ferry. It was later reconfigured as an expedition class vessel for exploring polar waters. So for the entire life of the ship it was intended to be in cold waters. As we sailed north and left the cold Benguela current, the water temperature went from 14C to 29C. The problem on the ship was excess heat, the exact opposite of what ship normally has to deal with.

The interior of the ship was getting hot and the conditions we were sailing under didn’t allow for easy cooling. The chief engineer spent several days on the problem and eventually got the air conditioning running great. The rooms were comfortable and the ship had basically adapted (at least for a few weeks) to life in a tropical climate. It was sort of like Scotty on Star Trek reconfiguring one system for another totally different purpose.

Life on a ship is interesting and very different from what most landlubbers are used to. I’ll have more about the workings and operations of the ship over the next few weeks.

Next Stop: Point Noire, Republic of Congo

Day 8, West Africa Cruise – Lobito/Benguela, Angola

Latitude: 12° 19.6046’ S
Longitude: 13° 34.6452’ E

I wasn’t sure what to expect in Angola.

Angola has a horrible reputation amongst travelers. It is one of the most difficult and expensive countries in the world for which to get a visa. Simple, non-luxury hotel rooms can run $500/night. Meals and other services for travelers are similarly outrageously priced. Basically, Angola doesn’t seem want tourists and is quite happy if visitors stay away.

Prior to our arrival in Lobito, I wasn’t expecting much in the way of a tourism infrastructure. In addition to everything I said above about Angola, Lobito and the nearby city of Benguela aren’t even close to being the top attractions in the country.

I was right. Lobito isn’t a major tourist attraction, but that turned out not to be a bad thing. It was refreshing to visit a place where the people you saw on the street were genuinely as interested in you as you were in them.
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Day 7, West Africa Cruise – At Sea, Off the Southern Coast of Angola

Latitude: 13° 21.6551’ S
Longitude: 12° 20.2529’ E

Thoughts On the Map of Africa

The map of Africa is one of the most nonsensical and artificial things on Earth. With the exception of the recent border between Sudan and South Sudan, every one of the lines on the map was drawn by European powers without any regard to the reality on the ground. This becomes especially obvious when you notice the patchwork of European languages which make up Africa.

On this trip we left Cape Town where English is the common language, but many of the European descended population speaks Afrikaans, which is derived from Dutch. North in Nambibia, you can still find a small population of German speakers. Above that in Angola, all the signs and the common language is Portuguese. North of Angola is the Congo where French is widely spoken. Go a bit further and you’ll find Spanish speakers in the tiny nation of Equatorial Guinea. Keeping going north of the Sahara and you’ll find people speaking Arabic.

None of these of course are native languages to Africa.

If you look at a tribal or language map of Africa, and it looks even more fragmented than the current map and has no relation whatsoever to the current borders. Many of the problems which Africa has had since decolonization has been an indirect result of the way the borders were drawn by the European powers.

The ironic thing, is that the borders are now pretty much locked into place because each country now has an elite which has benefited from the status quo borders. So, tribal groups are split up with majorities and minorities depending on what side of the border they are on, resulting in cronyism, tribalism and ethnic conflicts.

The events of the 18th and 19th century are still effecting things today. We never really escape history.

Next stop: Lobito, Angola.

Day 6, West Africa Cruise – At Sea, Off the Coast of Northern Namibia

Latitude: 17° 46.8330’ S
Longitude: 11° 31.5789’ E

The next stop for the G Expedition is Angola, which is the first real country we visit which will require visas for everyone.

Traveling to West Africa with a boat full of people from multiple countries is a giant immigration nightmare. Most of the countries we will be visiting require a visa for all visitors and some of the countries have a reputation for being some of the most expensive and difficult to get in the world. Our next stop in Angola has a reputation for being one of the hardest countries to enter if you don’t live in Africa.

One of the benefits of traveling by ship is that the visa process is easier and cheaper than it would be if you were to travel to all these countries individually. I spoke with the ship’s bursar Lawrence, who is responsible for dealing with all the paperwork for the visas for all the ship’s passengers. Here is some information which he shared with me about the visa process and what passengers need to know.

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Day 5, West Africa Cruise – Walvis Bay / Swakopmund

Latitude: 22° 40.6211′ S
Longitude: 14° 31.4368′ E

Day 5 brought the good ship Expedition to the port of Walvis Bay, Namibia.

Walvis Bay is the most important port in all of Southwestern Africa. It not only is the primary port for Namibia, but also Botswana and parts of Angola, South Africa and Zambia. Formerly a whaling station (walvis means ‘whale’ in German), today it is the best natural deep water port in this corner of the continent.

Prior to 1990 Namibia was a territory of South Africa known as South West Africa. After Namibia gained independence in 1990, Walvis Bay remained a small South African enclave because of its importance. It wasn’t until 1994 when Nelson Mandela became the president of South Africa that Walvis Bay was returned to Namibia.
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Day 4, West Africa Cruise – Luderitz, Namibia

Latitude: 26° 38.4852′ S
Longitude: 15° 09.2238′ E

Today we made our first stop on the trip: Luderitz, Namibia.

I had been looking forward to Luderitz for one reason: the Kolmanskopf Ghost Town. I had seen photos taken by other photographers that blew me away. Kolmanskopf is a German diamond mining town just outside of Luderitz that was established in the very early parts of the 20th century and abandoned about 50 years ago. The buildings and some of the furnishings are still in place and are slowly being reclaimed by the desert.

My goal was to get several images of the abandoned buildings, half filled with sand. To that end, I’d say my mission was accomplished.


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Day 3, West Africa Cruise – At Sea, Off the Coast of Namibia

Latitude: 28° 30.4763’ S
Longitude: 15° 34.7887’ E

A day at sea for a passenger vessel is a challenge for the crew. You have a group of people who are stuck in a small space with nothing to do. There is no television. Internet and telephone connectivity is either non-existent or severely limited.

On larger cruise ships, they usually try to fill time with frivolous things like bingo, movies and shopping for cheesy art and jewelry. The Expedition, thankfully, fills time with more informative and intellectual pursuits.

Today, for example, there was a lecture on the German colonial involvement in Namibia and the Namibian resistance. Another lecture which was an introduction to photography and finally an even lecture on African cosmology, including a nighttime walk on the deck of the ship to look at the stars (with the ships lights turned off).

Future lectures include native birds, more history, geology more history, more photography and more wildlife.

What is wonderful isn’t just the fact that these lectures are offered, but that almost all of the passengers are willing to show up to every single one.

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Day 2, West Africa Cruise – Cape Town

Latitude: 33° 54.2614′ S
Longitude: 18° 24.9283′ E

Checking passengers on to a ship is not the same as checking into a hotel. You can’t just have people check-in willy nilly over the course of a day. There are issues with security, immigration and the port authority, so the first day is usually at a hotel so everyone can then board the boat at the same time in an organized fashion.

It also gives an opportunity for everyone to explore Cape Town and meet the other travelers before we board the ship. Exploring the endpoints of cruise are usually up to the individual, so this actually a great opportunity for people who haven’t been to Cape Town before.
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Day 1, West Africa Cruise – Cape Town

Latitude: 33° 54.2614′ S
Longitude: 18° 24.9283′ E

Today I begin one of my biggest adventures yet: spending one month sailing up the West Coast of Africa on G Adventure’s M/S Expedition. We will be spending 32 days going up the west coast of Africa from Cape Town to Morocco.

As a Wander in Residence for G Adventures, I have had the opportunity to travel with G on tours around the world. This tour, however, might very well be the most coveted one in the entire G catalog. Just to put it in perspective, since I got approval to go on the tour last year, almost every single person I’ve met who works for G, 1) knew that I was going on the trip and 2) expressed their jealously that I was going. This is from a company of well traveled people who deal with tours on a daily basis.

Two months ago I took a day trip to the Drakensberg Mountains in South Africa where I met two men who worked for STA Travel in South Africa. STA is a partner of G Adventures and books many trips for them. When I told them I was going on the West Africa trip, even they expressed their jealously.

Though this is only the second year the trip has been run, it has quickly developed a reputation as one of the most desired tours in the entire G Adventures lineup.

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This Week In Travel – Episode 164

This week’s guest Dick Jordan from Tales Told from the Road.


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