UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Belarus

There are 4 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Belarus. Three are listed as Cultural sites and 1 is recognized as a Natural site.

  • Architectural, Residential and Cultural Complex of the Radziwill Family at Nesvizh (2005)
  • Mir Castle Complex (2000)
  • Struve Geodetic Arc (2005)
  • The Białowieża Forest (1979,1992,2014)

Architectural, Residential and Cultural Complex of the Radziwill Family at Nesvizh (2005)

The Architectural, Residential and Cultural Complex of the Radziwill Family at Nesvizh, simply known as Nesvizh Castle, is one of the cultural UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Belarus. It was inscribed in 2005 and is located in Nyasvizh, Belarus. This residential castle is owned by the Radziwi?? family in the 16th century.

This UNESCO site consists of various structures including a residential castle and the Corpus Christi Church. The structure is recognized of cultural significance as the family played as patrons and politicians of the art during the time of the dynasty’s rule from the 16th to the 19th centuries. Their influence is evident in the use of Baroque and Renaissance design for the entire architectural complex.

Mir Castle Complex (2000)

This is another cultural site in Belarus that is recognized by UNESCO for its cultural significance. This site consists of military architecture that provides a glimpse into the long history of confrontation in the region. The architectural style features a blend of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque elements rolled into one. The 16th century castle features five towers that are constructed using alternating bricks and large boulders.

The towers are linked together by 3-meter thick walls. Aside from the towers, the castle grounds also consist of a chapel, landscaped garden, and a Mir ghetto memorial.

Struve Geodetic Arc (2005)

This is the third of the cultural UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Belarus. However, this property isn’t attributed to Belarus alone as it is a multi-national UNESCO property. It is a chain of survey triangulations that starts in Norway and ends in the Black Sea. Hence, it covers 10 countries and up to 2,820 kilometers of length. This project was carried out by astronomer Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struve, who wanted to take the first accurate measurement of the long segment of meridian. The Dorpat Observatory in Estonia serves as the focal point for this site as many of the others are not worthy of a visit.

The Białowieża Forest (1979,1992,2014)

Considered as the last primeval forest in lowland Europe, the The Białowieża Forest is the only natural property listed as one of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Belarus. It spans a total land area of 1,500 square kilometers. It was once under serious threat from logging; however, this was stopped the moment the site was declared a UNESCO property. It was designed in order to preserve the natural habitat of rare species of birds, insects, and mushrooms. It also serves as the final refuge for what remains of the European bison.

Aside from being recognized as a UNESCO site, the Bia?owie?a Forest is also a Biosphere Reserve.


View my complete list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.