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UNESCO World Heritage Site #210: Upper Middle Rhine Valley

UNESCO World Heritage Site #210: Upper Middle Rhine Valley

UNESCO World Heritage Site #210: Upper Middle Rhine Valley

From the World Heritage inscription:

The strategic location of the dramatic 65km stretch of the Middle Rhine Valley between Bingen, Rüdesheim und Koblenz as a transport artery and the prosperity that this engendered is reflected in its sixty small towns, the extensive terraced vineyards and the ruins of castles that once defended its trade.

The river breaks through the Rhenish Slate Mountains, connecting the broad floodplain of the Oberrheingraben with the lowland basin of the Lower Rhine. The property extends from the Bingen Gate (Binger Pforte), where the River Rhine flows into the deeply gorged, canyon section of the Rhine Valley, through the 15km long Bacharach valley, with smaller V-shaped side valleys, to Oberwesel where the transition from soft clay-slates to hard sandstone, results. In a series of narrows, the most famous of which is the Loreley, no more than 130m wide (and at 20m the deepest section of the Middle Rhine), and then up to the Lahnstein Gate (Lahnsteiner Pforte), where the river widens again into the Neuwied Valley. The property also includes the adjoining middle and upper Rhine terraces (Upper Valley) which bear witness to the course taken by the river in ancient times.

As a transport route, the Rhine has served as a link between the southern and northern halves of the continent since prehistoric times, enabling trade and cultural exchange, which in turn led to the establishment of settlements. Condensed into a very small area, these subsequently joined up to form chains of villages and small towns. For over a 1,000 years the steep valley sides have been terraced for vineyards.

The landscape is punctuated by some 40 hill top castles and fortresses erected over a period of around 1,000 years. Abandonment and later the wars of the 17th century left most as picturesque ruins. The later 18th century saw the growth of sensibility towards the beauties of nature, and the often dramatic physical scenery of the Middle Rhine Valley, coupled with the many ruined castles on prominent hilltops, made it appeal strongly to the Romantic movement, which in turn influenced the form of much 19th century restoration and reconstruction.

The Upper Middle Rhine Valley is by far the largest cultural world heritage site in Germany. It covers a 65km stretch of the Rhine river from Koblenz to Bingen.

Within that stretch of river you will find 40 forts and castles, one of Germany’s greatest wine producing regions as well and one of Europe’s most important transportation routes with barges, trains and cars going up and down both banks of the river.

The Rhine was also the border of the Roman Empire and has also been fought over for the last two thousand years by countless armies, lords and kings.

I was in the Rhine Valley for less than a day, which is really not enough to experience the region properly. I’d plan at least 2-3 days if not more.

View my complete list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

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