Monthly Archives: September 2009

June in Paris

Posted by on September 15, 2009

June in Paris

June in Paris

During the course of the last two years, I’ve met countless people. Most have been completely forgettable and some have been what Tyler Durden in Fight Club called “single serving friends”. Someone you might talk to for an evening or hangout with for a day and then you and them go your separate ways. At best you might friend each other on Facebook. Most probably, you will never see or hear from them again. There is a good chance you never even got each others names.

Most of the people I meet I never mention because there isn’t really anything to say. Some like Arun in Oman, Peter in Cairns, Susan in Fiji, and others deserve special mention. As it is usually the case now, most of the people I meet are readers of the blog or follow me on Twitter. Occasionally, however, I meet someone special, totally unexpected and out of the blue. That was the case in Paris when I ran into June.

June admiring the water lilies

June admiring the water lilies

June just happened to be standing in front of me in line for tickets at Versailles. If there had been another person between us in line, I never would have met her. The line was exceptionally long and after some point we started up a conversation. June is Chinese and immigrated to Australia several years ago to pursue her masters and PhD, which she recently completed. She is currently teaching at the University of New South Wales and spent three weeks traveling around Europe. Paris was her last stop. The day I left Paris was the day she flew back to Sydney. Like most Chinese who have to deal with westerners, June is not her given name, (real Chinese name is Zhiqiong) but most English speakers can’t pronounce it properly, so I’ll stick with June.

After getting our tickets and standing in line for 90 minutes, we ended up spending the rest of our time in Versailles together taking photos and just chewing the fat as we walked around the gardens desperately trying to find out where and when the water show was taking place. (we ended up missing it). After that we took the train back to Paris and ended up getting dinner at a French/Vietnamese fusion restaurant with her friend Gordan who was also from Australia and who was in Paris for a conference. She poured us water while explaining that in China it is the woman’s role to pour water for the men, which of course made us both pour water for her later on which she didn’t object to at all.

The line we avoided by walking up the Eiffel Tower

The line we avoided by walking up the Eiffel Tower

We agreed to meet up again the next day at the Eiffel Tower at 10am. Avoiding the enormous long lines for the elevator we walked to the first and second levels of the tower and eventually went up to the very top. After visiting the tower we crossed the river and had lunch near Avenue President Wilson where we talked about China. She was an attorney in China before moving to Australia and I learned more about China during an hour of lunch than I had on the rest of my trip, even though I think she was frustrated trying to explain things to me at times.

After lunch we walked towards the Louvre and visited the Musée de l’Orangerie to look at Monet’s Water Lillies and had a chocolate crepe with banana. Afterword, we headed to the subway and we each went to our respective hotels. I didn’t have a cell phone so she couldn’t contact me and I couldn’t contact her. I was kicking myself for not arranging to meet up with her for dinner that evening.

And that was it.

Total time from running into her at Versailles to parting ways in the metro was bout 30 hours. It was a friendship with the lifespan of a mayfly, and sadly it couldn’t have been any other way. If circumstances were any different, even slightly, we never would have met. If I had taken 30 seconds more in getting from the train to the line in Versailles, we would have missed each other. If she had stopped to pick up a coin, she would have been in a different spot in line.

The most memorable things you experience when traveling are the things you can’t plan for. You can check off all the places in your guidebook, but the things you will remember most are the ones which are the result of serendipity.

The Quick and Dirty Guide to American National Parks

Posted by on September 14, 2009

Mount Rushmore National Monument

Mount Rushmore National Monument

This guide is for both Americans who are looking to explore their own country, and for those from outside of the US who are looking to make a trip to America. It is by no means an exhaustive treatment of the subject, but it should answer some of the obvious questions and give you a place to start your planning.

The National Park System

Parks in the United States can be very confusing. Every level of government has their own parks. Cities (Central Park in New York), states (Redwood State Park in California) and federal (Yellowstone) all have their own park systems. The National Park System is a division of the Department of the Interior and is responsible for the 391 locations in the National Park System.

Entrance to Wind Cave National Park

Entrance to Wind Cave National Park

They should not be confused with the National Forest system which is run by the Department of the Agriculture (yes, trees are viewed as a crop). National Forests are often run like parks but with important differences. They usually are not as developed for tourism, often allow hunting and fishing and limited firewood gathering. National Parks seldom allow hunting (none that I am aware of), and does not allow the collection of firewood and rocks. The National Park Service also manages historical sites as well as the city park system in Washington DC.

Park System Naming Conventions

The National Park System includes not only national parks, but monuments, historic sites, battlefields, recreation areas, preserves, seashores, lakeshores, trails, scenic rivers, and other designations. Officially, there is no difference between the titles given to locations. Unofficially, locations given the designation of “National Park” are usually considered the premier destinations in the system.

Sometimes a site might be upgraded from a preserve or monument to the status of a park. Theodore Roosevelt National Wildlife Refuge was upgraded to a national park in 1978, for example.

Ellis Island National Monument

Ellis Island National Monument


What Is And Isn’t In The Park System

Many of the famous landmarks in the United States are not part of the National Park System. The Golden Gate Bridge, the Hollywood sign in LA, The Smithsonian Museums, Mount Vernon, and Monticello are not part of the park system. The decision process of what is and what is not part of the park system is often a matter of politics. Only a few block from Independence Hall in Philadelphia is the Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial. Who is Thaddeus Kosciuszko you ask? Exactly. It was basically a bone thrown to the Polish-American community.

There is a National Park Service location in every state and US Territory including Guam, American Samoa, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

Bison in Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Bison in Theodore Roosevelt National Park


The Crown Jewels in the Park System

You are probably aware of the top attractions in the park system. The big three are usually considered to be The Grand Canyon, Yellowstone and Yosemite. After this, there are a large group of second tier parks which outstanding in their own right, but just don’t get as much attention. These include: Death Valley (CA), Galcier (MT), Denali (AK), Rocky Mountain (CO), Grand Teton (WY), Zion (UT), Sequoia (CA), Arches (UT), Great Smoky Mountains (TN), Acadia (ME), Everglades (FL), Volcanoes (HI), and Olympic (WA). You will notice that all but three of these (Acadia, Everglades and Smoky Mountains) are located west of the Rocky Mountains.

On a related note, most of the major historic sites in the park system are located in the east: Statue of Liberty (NY), Independence Hall (PA), Gettysburg (PA), Valley Forge (PA), National Mall (DC), Gateway Arch (MO),

National Park Passport and Season Pass

One other thing should be noted. You can purchase a small passport book in any bookshop in the park system. You can then collect stamps (rubber stamps with ink) at every park service location. It is great fun for kids and adults. I’ve collected over 100 stamps so far in the 10 years I’ve been doing it. In fact I’ve purchased three books because I’ve been to locations and forgot to bring my book. While I have read of people who have visited every national park, it is something which would be difficult for most people to achieve in a lifetime.

You can also get a year pass to every national park location for $80 per year. If you do a lot of traveling it can quickly pay for itself. Each entrance to Yellowstone for example is $25 and most large parks have some sort of entrance fee. Some parks do not have an entrance fee but do charge for parking, which is not covered by the pass.

Conclustion

With 391 locations in the National Park system, there will probably be something in the area no matter where you travel in the US. Take the time and do some research before you make a visit. The US National Park system is arguable the best in the world and worthy of exploration.

UNESCO World Heritage Site #72 – Historic Centre of Siena

Posted by on September 13, 2009

World Heritage Site #72: Historic Centre of Siena

World Heritage Site #72: Historic Centre of Siena

From the World Heritage inscription:

Siena is the embodiment of a medieval city. Its inhabitants pursued their rivalry with Florence right into the area of urban planning. Throughout the centuries, they preserved their city’s Gothic appearance, acquired between the 12th and 15th centuries. During this period the work of Duccio, the Lorenzetti brothers and Simone Martini was to influence the course of Italian and, more broadly, European art. The whole city of Siena, built around the Piazza del Campo, was devised as a work of art that blends into the surrounding landscape.

Siena is an easy train ride from Florence. I spent the day there taking photos and strolling around the city. While it is definitely touristy, it is a far cry from the tourist levels you will see in Florence or Venice. In addition to the center of town, the cathedral and side streets are also worth exploring.

UNESCO World Heritage Site #71: Piazza del Duomo, Pisa

Posted by on September 12, 2009

World Heritage Site #71: Piazza del Duomo, Pisa

World Heritage Site #71: Piazza del Duomo, Pisa

From the World Heritage inscription:

Standing in a large green expanse, Piazza del Duomo houses a group of monuments known the world over. These four masterpieces of medieval architecture – the cathedral, the baptistry, the campanile (the ‘Leaning Tower’) and the cemetery – had a great influence on monumental art in Italy from the 11th to the 14th century.

Most people have heard of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, but most people have no idea of the context of the tower. It is actually just the bell tower for the Pisa Cathedral. The entire cathedral complex is as impressive as the tower. The cathedral is a mishmash of old bricks from previous buildings and has strong Arab influences. The best part of going to Pisa, however, is watching tourists take photos of themselves trying to hold up the tower.

Oh Dakota! Update On My Tour of the West

Posted by on September 11, 2009


Buffalo in Theodore Roosevelt NP

Buffalo in Theodore Roosevelt NP

I’m writing this at a Taco John’s with free Wifi in Sheridan, Wyoming. The last several days since I left Minneapolis have been busy. Very busy. My days have consisted of driving, taking photos, editing photos and sleeping. Today I’ll be crossing the Big Horn Mountains and should arrive in Yellowstone in the later afternoon.

Despite the hectic schedule, I’ve seen a lot of amazing things. In Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota I was able to gets some great closeup photos of bison, mule deer, prairie dogs and wild horses. It is a really under appreciated National Park and one which I’ll be writing more about soon.

Mule deer buck at sunset

Mule deer buck at sunset

From North Dakota I traveled south to the Black Hills of South Dakota. The drive was really interesting as I was able to get off the interstate and get a much closer look at the farms and prairie of the western Dakotas. In the Black Hills I did the obligatory pilgrimage to Mount Rushmore and drove through Custer State Park and visited Wind Cave National Park. I also was able to get some great photos of cowboys on horseback herding buffalo in Custer.

The biggest thing for me so far has been being able to take wildlife photos. This is something I’ve never been able to do well, and honestly, I still don’t think I have the lens to do it properly. All my photos have been taken near my car and on the road because my lens only goes to 200mm and isn’t very fast. I’m hoping I can add some elk to my collection in Yellowstone.

I’ll be in Yellowstone/Grand Tetons for about 4-5 days before heading up to Glacier and then to Calgary/Banff. So if you are in Calgary and would like to meet up, you can sort of figure on me being there in about a week.